On Their Own

winter potsI posted some time ago about the landscape I designed for my clients who live in a rural area outside Ann Arbor. They edited and installed that landscape on their own – to everyone’s  great satisfaction. I was happy indeed that they took my plan to heart, and edited it to reflect their point of view. Late this fall they planted a wide ribbon of grape hyacinths in the lawn beginning near the large round planter and running all the way to the road. There’s nothing like having a river of grape hyacinths to look forward to in the spring, is there? Eventually, there may be some trees on either side of that river.  Their last garden project of the season-the winter pots. They came to the shop the other day to with to consult with me about their plans, and look at materials. Of course they would do their winter pots on their own.

winter potsI spent plenty of time talking them through their design process.  They knew they wanted to use cut white birch branches, and spruce tips.  And they wanted to incorporate the color red. Their taste is tends towards the contemporary, but in a loose and brash way. Containers filled with natural materials informally arranged proved to be a strikingly beautiful contrast to their sober and spare landscape.

img_0191This post is not so much about what I advised them to do. It is primarily about what they did on their own. This winter pot is terrific.  I was delighted when Rich sent me this group of photographs. The greens in the bottom of this container are spruce tips, from Minnesota. Dan had them shipped in.  I have never seen them before. These spruce toppers sunk into the soil of a container looked like a forest of mini trees. This container is as good as it gets, in my opinion. It is relaxed, assured, and striking. The thin red twig branches against the stout birch branches-so beautiful.

winter potsI did advise them to light their pots. Their property is in a rural area. Absent a full moon, their property is shrouded in darkness. The light in the winter pots would be key to welcoming guests, and representing a warm winter. It took a bit of doing to convince them to spring for a 3′ diameter spiked light ring encircled with LED lights, but they eventually decided that my advice was good advice. After much discussion, they took that ring home with them. Set into their 5 foot diameter steel bowl container facing the road, that light ring not only illuminated what was in the pot, it lit up the walk to the front door.     img_4253The materials they chose? Mountain hemlock, for its feathery texture, and its longevity as a cut green. Noble fir is a cut green whose stout stems amicably support lights, and obligingly stay green throughout the winter. The magnolia branches in this container feature big leaves. Those big glossy green leaves are a nod to romance. The Michigan winter is spare and gray. Cut magnolia is luscious – juicy looking. The hollow birch bark rounds are chubby and charming. The faux red berry stems hover over all.  Happily, they will represent for many winters to come. The Lumineo warm LED light strings illuminate the greens.

winter containersThis is work that I am happy to share here.  I greatly admire what they have done.

winter container arrangementsaa

We provided the centerpieces for this pair of winter containers.  Our client did the rest. Lovely, aren’t they?

This planter was constructed by a client who shopped on line with us for some of her materials.

This client shopped at Detroit Garden Works for materials too.

These containers are the creation of a member of my group. I like that he had the enthusiasm to go home and make winter pots, after making them for others day after day.

I truly enjoy what people say back to me about the garden.

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Red And Green

holiday container centerpieceThe combination of red and green at the holidays is bound to elicit some yawns or boos from those who would suggest there are more innovative and creative color combinations a gardener might pursue. I find fault with this idea. Color combinations in and of themselves do not suggest traditional or contemporary. Color is a design element that takes its emotional cue from the organizing efforts of a designing eye. Red and green might typically be very traditional colors at the holiday season, but they can be used in a way that is anything but traditional. These clients favor a decidedly contemporary and color rich holiday expression. Red and green – this is what they like.  Their steel topiary form from is stuffed full of cardinal red twigs, or whips, that have very little in the way of side branching. This choice of material accents the strong vertical element established by the form. The form itself is lighted with LED lights from Lumineo. The spare vertical element represented by the lighted form and the red twig branches is countered by a group of lax red berry picks.  The sculptural effect is anything but traditional. Holiday red in this instance is quite contemporary in feeling.

red and green Christmas treeWe also set up and dress their Christmas tree. The tree is decorated with red and lime green ball ornaments, both matte and shiny, stuck with paper wrapped wire stems.  The ornaments are not hung from the tree branches in the traditional way. They are laid into and onto the tree as if they were a pick. The balls are next to weightless, so the stiff stems of the tree hold them up. My crew was certain we would not be able to put all 280 ball picks into this tree, but once they got they got the hang of laying them in, the tree easily handled them all.

holiday treeThis method allowed us to place ornament very close to the trunk of tree, as well as on the tips.  The long wire acts as ballast, and helps to balance them on the tree. The ornaments nearest to front edge appear to be floating. Once the ball ornaments were placed, we added a single white LED light garland. I would say this representation of holiday red and green is layered, crisp, clean, and sculptural. This traditional holiday element, the Christmas tree, has a more contemporary look.

red and green holiday arrangementThe deck off the kitchen has one pot for the winter. Imagine this winter view from the kitchen without that container. A foreground element in a landscape is an important one, as is possible to focus on every detail. What is happening at a distance is visually hazy at best, but it is what I would call a traditional suburban landscape. The contrast between the pot and the landscape is considerable. The design upshot of of the relationship between the foreground and the background elements is the creation of a sense of depth. Interesting spatial relationships make a composition lively. Why would I think the red and the green elements in this container are non traditional? The green portion of the arrangement is the smallest element in size and supports a red top which is over scaled and dominant in feeling. A more traditional arrangement would be more conventionally balanced, with lots of greens at the bottom, and a smaller and less prominent mid section.

holiday containerThe juxtaposition of the brilliant red of the berry picks, and the merlot red of the eucalyptus is a little jarring and standoffish, rather than pretty.

holiday container centerpieceThe pale limey green of the poly mesh is not what I would call traditional holiday green.

holiday containerThe red berry picks were installed at different heights. The effect is deliberately asymmetrical.

holiday containerYou may or may not be convinced by anything I have had to say about these pots, but that was not my intent. I had an interest in explaining the design process for this project.  It is a challenge to warmly represent red and green at the holidays in a non traditional way.  In a bigger sense, is even more of a design challenge to avoid visual stereotypes. I planted my first and one and only dwarf Japanese maple for a client this past spring – in a container. As beautiful as they can be I have yet to figure out how to place one in the landscape that does not look routine.

holiday potsNo matter whether you source materials from from your garden, the farmer’s market, or a roadside field, getting them to look like what you imagined calls for some design.

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Start To Finish

the-winter-landscape-18I have posted several times about a landscape project that was designed in 2015, and finally finished earlier this year. It was one of those rare moments when establishing a rapport with a committed client is instantaneous, and has staying power. The opportunity to work with them came courtesy of the Art-Harrison Design Studio. Arturo and Barry introduced me to their clients. That introduction eventually turned into a mission to renovate the landscape for this 1920’s era home in Detroit. The landscape was finished this past July. Our work this past week revolved around arrangements in their pots for the holiday and winter, and lighting. This large lighted wreath destined for a second story window was a little spare-we added some garland, picks and pods.

the-winter-landscape-9Installed in front of a second story window, the proportion is good, and the pale cones and pods read well from the ground.

the-winter-landscape-10The winter arrangements for the front door pots were installed this morning.  All of the construction work of this was done in our garage over the past few days. I like keeping that mess at home. In the centerpieces – red bud pussy willow, alder branches, taupe eucalyptus, sinamay, and LED lighting.

the-winter-landscape-13

At the end of the day today, on his way home, David added some white berry picks to the pots. I thought the pots needed it. Do we revise after an installation?  All the time. I knew the lights would be warm-thus the gold mesh sinamay wrapped around the twigs. That sparkly nod to the holidays can be removed after New Year’s.

the-winter-landscape-12At 4pm the front door looks inviting. The lighting in the winter pots augments the  coach lights on either side of the door, and the landscape lighting

img_8939By 5:30 pm, it is nearly dark. Not so, this front door. It is a well lit space that welcomes guests.

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Lighted winter arrangements light the way. They turn back the long dark months that are sure to come. Any project I take on this time of year has some form of lighting. Will this client run the lights all winter?  I hope so.  The advent of highly energy efficient LED lighting makes the decision to keep the lights on easy.This large pot in the side yard features a number of sumac branches.  The size, scale and color of them is good with the pot. Though the lighting is not so apparent in the afternoon, at dusk the light at the bottom of the eucalyptus will softly illuminate the centerpiece.

spiked light ring from Detroit Garden WorksThis spiked light ring is an alternate method of lighting a winter pot. I cannot explain why these light rings are so visually satisfying and beautiful, but they are.

the-winter-landscape-11It took the better part of the morning to install the winter arrangements in all of their pots, and hook up the lighting. Marzela is putting the finishing touches on this pot after the lighted steel hoop was set in the center. The light ring has an anchoring mechanism featuring 4 long steel legs that can be pushed through the foam form, and into the soil below it. Owen and LaBelle lighted the dome of the pergola and hung the lighted sphere a few days ago. More pictures to follow.

the-winter-landscape-2set for the holiday

the-winter-landscape-8decorated and lighted steel sphere

the-winter-landscape-7lighted wreath

the-winter-landscape-4winter pots

the-winter-landscape-5box dressed for winter with tiger branches, pods, cones, and mixed cut evergreens

the-winter-landscape-1another view

img_2984the rear terrace

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tiger branches and white eucalyptus

light ring

dusk

img_8935celebrating the circle, and the season.

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Putting It All Together

cut variegated boxwood branchesWe are in the thick of the winter container gardening season. The shop sees to stocking and restocking great materials, which means that the landscape company has a shop full of cut greens, berries and picks in addition to fresh cut branches from which to choose. Those clients who choose to have us dress their holiday and winter pots keep my crews busy until the end of the year. I am grateful for that, and for the opportunity to do the work. If you are a gardener who chooses to do your own, I have a few suggestions.  If you use any cut broad leaved evergreens in your containers, like the variegated boxwood pictured above, consider spraying them with an antidessicant after you have arranged them. Their broad and thin leaves will lose water quickly after they are cut. An antidessicant will help to slow the drying process. Fresh cut twigs stay fresh looking a long time without any additional help, as the bark keeps the moisture within the stem.

German boxwoodWe spray our cut branches of boxwood with Vapor Gard, which is a non toxic natural pine resin based wax that coats and seals the leaves. This prevents or slows the evaporation of the moisture inside the leaves that are no longer absorbing water from the roots of the plant. An antidessicant will help to prevent winter burn on broad leaved evergreen plants as well. Newly planted boxwood, or boxwood planted in an exposed location will benefit from an antidessicant spray. The label will tell you what plants will benefit from this treatment. Vapor Gard is a commercial grade antidessicant only available by the gallon, but Wilt-Pruf is available ready mixed in a spray bottle, a more appropriate size for the greens in a few pots. Spray the greens on a rain free day at the warmest moment of the day.  When I say spray, I really mean soak.

mountain hemlockMountain hemlock does not need any antidessicant spray. The cut branches are always in short supply. These trees grow at extremely high altitudes, and if snow comes early in the mountains, the harvest will be small. We stock as much as we can of this cut evergreen, as it will stay obligingly green the entire winter. Evergreens have needle like foliage for a reason. Each needle has a very small surface area, which means the rate of transpiration is correspondingly small. Evergreens continue to photosynthesize, even though the roots cannot absorb water from the frozen ground in the winter. This is why it is so important that evergreens be well watered prior to the ground freezing. Evergreen foliage structure has evolved to keep moisture loss during the dormant season to a minimum. This mountain hemlock is Michigan winter proof.  These cut stems will look as good next March as they do now.

winter berryThe berried stems of ilex verticillata  are a favorite at the holidays.  That vibrant red has yet to be matched by any artificial stem. However, cut ilex stems tend to shed berries at an alarming rate. An antidessicant will greatly slow that shedding. The winter berry stems that I soak with Vapor Gard insure that those berries hold on for a good portion of the winter. We spray all of the branches that come in to the shop with Vapor Gard.

sugar pine conesThese sugar cones are not native to trees in my zone, but they naturally express the season. We group them on winter garlands, and stuff them into the greens of winter pots. The big scale, obvious texture and durable quality make them a candidate for inclusion in winter containers. Pine cones are tough as nails. Their scales are as woody as a tree branch.

detroit-garden-works-holiday-preview-13We have a variety of pine cones and stemmed seed pods dusted with white wash. I like this frosty look. A pairing with with tiger branches is a monochromatic color scheme that is quite wintry.

 

white washed pods for winter containersLike this.

dsc_1141Fresh cut bunches of southern magnolia provide big leaves – green on the upper surface, and fuzzy brown on the obverse. The leaves curl beautifully as they dry, and will stick tight to the stem the entire winter. Our supplier is known for her heavily branched bunches that are like bouquets.

red bud pussy willowThis winter installation from last year is all about the layering of materials.  The effect is warm and inviting.

materials-for-winter-pots-4Plastic is not my first choice for a winter container, but plastic berry picks are entirely waterproof and winter proof.  They can be reused for a number of seasons. Some of ours have stems that are wrapped in brown paper which is then waxed. They may not seem so appealing in their raw state, but placed in a container full of natural materials, they are quite believable.

white berry pickswhite plastic berries and plum eucalyptus

detroit-garden-works-holiday-preview-11This red felt ribbon finished with a white hemstitch is handsome.  The oversized width makes it great for holiday decorating.  Would I be concerned about using it outside? No. Most materials do not mind cold or snow. But some materials are not happy subjected to late fall rains.  Ask or test before you put a material outdoors for the winter.

detroit-garden-works-holiday-preview-8These felt birds would look great perched on a window sill all winter long.

materials-for-winter-pots-8We have a client with an entire family of our grapevine deer. As they spend the winter outdoors, we seal them with Waterlox once a year. This helps to keep the grapevine from deteriorating.  Every holiday, we make collars for them – this year is no exception. The idea here is that materials traditionally used indoors can be equally effective outdoors.

holiday wreathThis plain lighted artificial wreath got an upgrade from a 6′ pine cone garland, and some pods and berries.

materials-for-winter-pots-5This sphere is encircled by greens, lights, pods, magnolia, and gold berry picks.

materials-for-winter-pots-7Today is a relaxing day, with time available to reflect. Tomorrow we will be back to the making. Happy Thanksgiving.

 

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